Employee Burnout and How to Avoid it

In the past week, in conversations with contractors, two have mentioned that the ‘feel’ of their office has changed. When asked to clarify, the explanation was remarkably similar. 

The mood or energy seems off like a dark cloud had settled over their business.  

They both realized that the situation wasn’t caused by their job, it was an accumulation of everything that has been going on in the past few months. 

To combat the onset of employee burnout, both owners invested in counseling for their employees. Not equipment training. Not sales coaching. They invested in their health. Seeing their employees struggling, they stepped in to provide the resources to help them. While our industry has been largely untouched by the ‘isolation’ bug, your employees’ family and personal lives haven’t. Not being able to see their friends and family is taking an emotional toll on everyone, and it spills into their professional life. The lack of control, whether personal or professional, anxiety over the economy, the political atmosphere, even changes in the weather, and the amount of sunlight can all affect the attitude of your employees. 

An unengaged team member isn’t helping the business, potentially alienating both customers and other employees. 

There are numerous signs of burnout, but the three most common and consistent are:

  • Trouble concentrating
  • Increased negativity
  • Reduced productivity

It is easy to write these off as another bad day or a difficult personality. But, for your business and employee’s sake, you need to be proactive. In our industry, decreased attention to detail can cause increased callbacks, potential injury to your employee, or damage to your customer’s home or business.

Take the time to implement a few best practices to minimize burnout in your business:

 

Show your employees you value them as an employee: 

In a recent survey, 50% of employees said their careers have stalled or even regressed. Investing in training for your employees has numerous benefits, but training doesn’t have to be expensive. Mentoring, whether within your company or involving outside resources, can vastly improve morale. And it’s beneficial to both parties; asking someone to mentor or share their knowledge with others, who wouldn’t get a boost of confidence from that? Everyone likes to feel like they have something valuable to contribute. Investing in their future with the company will also help alleviate feelings of self-doubt.   

 

Show your employees you value them as a person:

Focus on your employees’ well-being. Encourage them to unplug. We recently limited our intake of news programming, both on-line and television. After a few days, I found that I was sleeping better, my anxiety had decreased, and I felt more optimistic in general. Your employees are taking on additional responsibilities at home while potentially dealing with financial concerns, their family’s health, and their children’s education. Talk with your employees about issues they may be facing. One company established a message board within their company, where team members can post their needs and offer services; they have high school students providing tutoring, a currently out-of-work spouse who makes meals for purchase, and a forum for asking advice and suggestions.  

 

Stay in touch:

If you have transitioned to a remote or partially remote workforce, staying in touch with your employees has become of even greater importance. Technology is great for staying connected, but personal interaction is needed as well. If you can’t meet in person, take the time to talk to them regularly. Not every interaction with your employees needs to be business-related. Yes, there are rules as to what you can discuss, but asking them about their weekend or their favorite sports team isn’t off-limits. 

 

Lead by Example:  

As a leader, “Do as I say, not as I do” just doesn’t work. If you work through meals, do not take breaks, and fail to focus on your well-being, your employees will follow. Limit your communications on weekends, late nights, and vacations. Take vacation days, and do not feel guilty about taking them. Your vacation days are earned, and both you and your employees should take them without remorse.   

There are many disadvantages of burnout for your business. But beyond that, there is the human factor of wanting what is best for your employees and their families. Work to create a healthy culture in your business to deal with and diminish employee burnout. There is not one single answer, but taking the time to find what works for you and your employees will only benefit your company in the future.  

 

Lynn Wise is the Founder and CEO of Contractor in Charge.

Service Roundtable is dedicated to growing your bottom line and helping your business maximize its full potential. These groups of contractors work together to assist you with marketing, sales, business, and so much more. Twice a month, seminars around the United States and Canada are held to network and further assist your business. Visit Service Roundtable.com to see if there are Success Days in your area!

Tech Lead Turnover – Do You Have a Process for That?

“Hey, Johnny, thanks for fixing our sink; it’s working great. And by the way, when you get back to your shop – mind asking someone to give me a call with a price for my fireplace? 

Don’t you have people that work on those? The season is changing, and I was having problems with it last year – I want to make sure it’s safe so we can start using it!”

Johnny, of course, responded to his customer, Mr. Zock, with a smile, assuring him that, “Of course, absolutely, it would be my pleasure to have someone call you – we work on fireplaces all the time.”

Insert silence here.

You know, that long and uncomfortable silent period you feel when you are trying to be polite as you wait and see if Johnny remembered to turn in the lead.

That SUPER HOT EXTRA SPECIAL GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY OF A LEAD!

Insert more silence.

Fast forward six months and arrive on the scene, back at the warm, cozy, and beautiful home of Mr. Zock, where the fireplace is blazing with the smell of apple cider in the air. Oh, make no mistake! Mr. Zock’s fireplace was repaired – as a matter of fact, he went ahead and upgraded to new ceramic logs, too! But it was not Johnny’s company that made the sale.

Sound familiar? It’s painful, isn’t it? How often do we train our team to hand over leads? Shoot, we even give them a form and ask them to write the leads on the form and return it with their paperwork.

Then why, oh why, are we slow in the slow seasons? If our team is turning in ALL of the opportunities they see, why are we ever slow?

Again, it’s painful – the truth hurts – we know we are losing leads, but it takes WORK to fix the problem, and sometimes we get tired of always doing hard work, don’t we?

Well, today is the day, my friend. With three months left in 2020, there is no time like the present to put a solid process in place – a solid process that the techs and office staff can follow to ensure ALL leads are captured.

And here’s how:
  1. Write a process – A process for capturing leads in the field and returning them to the office
  2. Test your process
    1. Pass out a one-page process sheet of this new process to one of your technicians, one that you trust and know will follow the process
    2. Inspect what you expect and receive feedback
  3. Tweak your process
    1. With real-life learnings from the field, make changes to the process so it’s a process the techs and management can follow
  4. Implement your process 
    1. Rollout this process to your entire team during a weekly training meeting

Processes don’t have to be boring. You can get creative with it! Whether text, written on the invoice, emailed, sent in a survey, linked to your customer testimonial request, etc., find a way to gather leads that work with the flow of what you are already doing. Once you figure out what method you should require for turning in leads, find a fun way to make it easy to implement so your team sees it through.

1. Offer an incentive: perhaps you consider giving your techs a fixed amount per lead that they turn in. 

If money isn’t their love language, try what speaks to them…maybe five leads equals one hour early that they could leave one day. Maybe for every 10, they get a gift card to take their family out. 

You could even have a “punch card” to keep track.  

2. Make it a game: have a friendly competition between your techs. 

Each month, count up the most follow-up leads or even the most booked leads from those turned in. Whoever gets the most leads wins the prize!

5. Set a time limit: require that all leads be turned in within 24 hours of the call so they are still “hot” leads. If a lead isn’t communicated within a timely manner, it doesn’t count towards the contest (but don’t forget—you still want it)! 

6. Simple follow-up: Here’s an idea to get your office staff involved; when your team calls the customer after the call to make sure they are satisfied, add to their script a question about any additional needs in the home. Book the additional lead from the happy call!   

Do you have an awesome idea for the process you could put in place or a way to motivate your team to collect those leads? Let’s talk! 

Send me your ideas at danielle@menupricing.com, or share them on our Facebook page.  

There’s still time to show 2020 who’s boss!  

P.S. Too busy and overwhelmed to start a process? Send me an email and ask for my FREE Process Writing Kit – I will mail it to you. That’s right, I’ll mail a clipboard, instructions, templates, and freebies directly to your door. Let’s simplify together. danielle@menupricing.com

Written by Danielle Putnam, President of The New Flat Rate and Immediate Past President of Women in HVACR

Service Roundtable is dedicated to growing your bottom line and helping your business maximize its full potential. These groups of contractors work together to assist you with marketing, sales, business, and so much more. Twice a month, seminars around the United States and Canada are held to network and further assist your business. Visit Service Roundtable.com to see if there are Success Days in your area!

The Power of TEN

This article is about power. 

The power of TEN and yes, it is powerful. It is not new math; it is not about logarithmic math; it is not about number set theory. 

But it is about simple old addition.

The power of $10 means raising $10.00 additional revenue dollars on each and every invoice. An invoice is a revenue touchpoint. So this is about raising $10 more on each and every revenue touchpoint; A ten-dollar bill –  Ten dollars – about the cost of two Starbuck coffees. Surely your team is worth two Starbuck coffees with the customer for the attention to detail, the customer service, culture, and professional experience offered by your organization!

Revenue per customer touchpoint is an interesting concept. It is a KPI. It forces an overall evaluation of the business model, the process refinement level, business mix management, and deployment of labor capacity. Here are a couple of examples.

First Example: 

Company A does $4,000,000 in revenue and has revenue touches of 240 install touches plus 1100 demand service call touches plus 950 service maintenance touches. That is a total of 2,290 revenue touches. Now divide $4,000,000 in total revenue by the revenue touches of 2,290. This equals $1,747 per revenue touch opportunity.

And with $10.00 more on each invoice, Company A gets an additional $22,900.00 net profit before taxes. 

There are no additional parts, no additional labor. It is simply setting your pricing to reflect the fact that you and your team are worth $10 more per call.

Second Example: 

Company B generates $11,000,000 in revenue and has revenue touches of 870 install touches plus 8,400 demand service call touches plus 4,000 service maintenance touches. That is a total of 13,270 revenue touches. Again, if the total $11,000,000 is divided by the 13,270 in revenue touches, this company’s per revenue touch opportunity is equal to $829.

And with $10.00 more on each invoice, Company B generates an additional $132,700.00 Net Profit.

Third Example: 

Company C does $3,800,000 in revenue and has revenue touches of 600 install touches plus 1600 demand service touches plus 1500 service maintenance touches. That is a total of 3,700 revenue touches and equals $1,027 per revenue touch opportunity.

And with $10.00 more on each invoice, Company C gets an additional $37,000.00 NPT.

Fourth Example: 

Company D does $6,000,000 in revenue and has revenue touches of 475 install touches plus 2300 demand service touches plus 3800 service maintenance touches for a total of 6,575 revenue touches. 

This equals $913 per revenue touch opportunity.

And with $10.00 more on each invoice, Company D gets an additional $65,750.00 NPT.

In Summary:

Company A….$4,000,000….$1,747 per touch point

Company B…$11,000,000….$829 per touchpoint

Company C…$3,800,000….$1027 per touchpoint

Company D…$6,000,000…$913 per touchpoint

Notice this KPI has nothing to do with the size of the revenue. Instead, this analysis is about efficiently balancing install and service labor utilization. That is the major difference between these companies. It is about effective marketing and building a strong value proposition in the market brand. It is also driven by average ticket and gross profit dollar contribution performance. It is about a very positive break-even mark. Here is a mini case study. 

Our son just had a no cooling event in Texas, where we have many 100 plus degree temperatures. He called a service provider who came out at a promised time. 

It was a condenser fan motor. Parts and labor were $629.00. Done deal, right?  

Here is the other part of the story. My son’s home is 16 years old and has the original builder selected system. He is lucky if that 16-year-old unit that is out of warranty is functioning at 9 SEER today. 

The technician never presented the option of a replacement solution and the benefits of a ten-year warranty and higher efficiency. And this is a consumer with the financial capacity to upgrade. So $629.00 could have been $8,629.00 very easily. And with financing only $120.00 per month for the customer! This is indicative of a revenue touch that was not optimized. This touch under-performed. That was not a good deal for the customer and not a good deal for the HVAC company.

Vicki and I attended one of the Super Conferences conducted by Stochastics, one of the Service Roundtable Preferred partners. Mike Layton commented that the perfect HVAC company is one that does installations only. Now, the reality is we have to stand behind what we sell and install and service. And leads do come from service for replacement equipment. But Mike makes a good point: We must balance the labor capacity utilization between installation and service. And looking at the revenue per customer touch illustrated above, too much service labor burn rate can stifle a company’s performance.

Vicki and I like to see 80% installation revenue versus 20% service revenue as a business model target, or as close as management can get to a 4:1 ratio.

Conclusion:

Too many labor hours devoted to service can stagnate a company’s growth potential. So, track and trend the revenue per customer touchpoint KPI. 

You will be glad you did.

 

Written by John LaPlant

Service Roundtable is dedicated to growing your bottom line and helping your business maximize its full potential. These groups of contractors work together to assist you with marketing, sales, business, and so much more. Twice a month, seminars around the United States and Canada are held to network and further assist your business. Visit Service Roundtable.com to see if there are Success Days in your area!This article is about power. 

The power of TEN and yes, it is powerful. It is not new math; it is not about logarithmic math; it is not about number set theory. 

But it is about simple old addition.

The power of $10 means raising $10.00 additional revenue dollars on each and every invoice. An invoice is a revenue touchpoint. So this is about raising $10 more on each and every revenue touchpoint; A ten-dollar bill –  Ten dollars – about the cost of two Starbuck coffees. Surely your team is worth two Starbuck coffees with the customer for the attention to detail, the customer service, culture, and professional experience offered by your organization!

Revenue per customer touchpoint is an interesting concept. It is a KPI. It forces an overall evaluation of the business model, the process refinement level, business mix management, and deployment of labor capacity. Here are a couple of examples.

First Example: 

Company A does $4,000,000 in revenue and has revenue touches of 240 install touches plus 1100 demand service call touches plus 950 service maintenance touches. That is a total of 2,290 revenue touches. Now divide $4,000,000 in total revenue by the revenue touches of 2,290. This equals $1,747 per revenue touch opportunity.

And with $10.00 more on each invoice, Company A gets an additional $22,900.00 net profit before taxes. 

There are no additional parts, no additional labor. It is simply setting your pricing to reflect the fact that you and your team are worth $10 more per call.

Second Example: 

Company B generates $11,000,000 in revenue and has revenue touches of 870 install touches plus 8,400 demand service call touches plus 4,000 service maintenance touches. That is a total of 13,270 revenue touches. Again, if the total $11,000,000 is divided by the 13,270 in revenue touches, this company’s per revenue touch opportunity is equal to $829.

And with $10.00 more on each invoice, Company B generates an additional $132,700.00 Net Profit.

Third Example: 

Company C does $3,800,000 in revenue and has revenue touches of 600 install touches plus 1600 demand service touches plus 1500 service maintenance touches. That is a total of 3,700 revenue touches and equals $1,027 per revenue touch opportunity.

And with $10.00 more on each invoice, Company C gets an additional $37,000.00 NPT.

Fourth Example: 

Company D does $6,000,000 in revenue and has revenue touches of 475 install touches plus 2300 demand service touches plus 3800 service maintenance touches for a total of 6,575 revenue touches. 

This equals $913 per revenue touch opportunity.

And with $10.00 more on each invoice, Company D gets an additional $65,750.00 NPT.

In Summary:

Company A….$4,000,000….$1,747 per touch point

Company B…$11,000,000….$829 per touchpoint

Company C…$3,800,000….$1027 per touchpoint

Company D…$6,000,000…$913 per touchpoint

Notice this KPI has nothing to do with the size of the revenue. Instead, this analysis is about efficiently balancing install and service labor utilization. That is the major difference between these companies. It is about effective marketing and building a strong value proposition in the market brand. It is also driven by average ticket and gross profit dollar contribution performance. It is about a very positive break-even mark. Here is a mini case study. 

Our son just had a no cooling event in Texas, where we have many 100 plus degree temperatures. He called a service provider who came out at a promised time. 

It was a condenser fan motor. Parts and labor were $629.00. Done deal, right?  

Here is the other part of the story. My son’s home is 16 years old and has the original builder selected system. He is lucky if that 16-year-old unit that is out of warranty is functioning at 9 SEER today. 

The technician never presented the option of a replacement solution and the benefits of a ten-year warranty and higher efficiency. And this is a consumer with the financial capacity to upgrade. So $629.00 could have been $8,629.00 very easily. And with financing only $120.00 per month for the customer! This is indicative of a revenue touch that was not optimized. This touch under-performed. That was not a good deal for the customer and not a good deal for the HVAC company.

Vicki and I attended one of the Super Conferences conducted by Stochastics, one of the Service Roundtable Preferred partners. Mike Layton commented that the perfect HVAC company is one that does installations only. Now, the reality is we have to stand behind what we sell and install and service. And leads do come from service for replacement equipment. But Mike makes a good point: We must balance the labor capacity utilization between installation and service. And looking at the revenue per customer touch illustrated above, too much service labor burn rate can stifle a company’s performance.

Vicki and I like to see 80% installation revenue versus 20% service revenue as a business model target, or as close as management can get to a 4:1 ratio.

Conclusion:

Too many labor hours devoted to service can stagnate a company’s growth potential. So, track and trend the revenue per customer touchpoint KPI. 

You will be glad you did.

 

Written by John LaPlant

Service Roundtable is dedicated to growing your bottom line and helping your business maximize its full potential. These groups of contractors work together to assist you with marketing, sales, business, and so much more. Twice a month, seminars around the United States and Canada are held to network and further assist your business. Visit Service Roundtable.com to see if there are Success Days in your area!This article is about power. 

The power of TEN and yes, it is powerful. It is not new math; it is not about logarithmic math; it is not about number set theory. 

But it is about simple old addition.

The power of $10 means raising $10.00 additional revenue dollars on each and every invoice. An invoice is a revenue touchpoint. So this is about raising $10 more on each and every revenue touchpoint; A ten-dollar bill –  Ten dollars – about the cost of two Starbuck coffees. Surely your team is worth two Starbuck coffees with the customer for the attention to detail, the customer service, culture, and professional experience offered by your organization!

Revenue per customer touchpoint is an interesting concept. It is a KPI. It forces an overall evaluation of the business model, the process refinement level, business mix management, and deployment of labor capacity. Here are a couple of examples.

First Example: 

Company A does $4,000,000 in revenue and has revenue touches of 240 install touches plus 1100 demand service call touches plus 950 service maintenance touches. That is a total of 2,290 revenue touches. Now divide $4,000,000 in total revenue by the revenue touches of 2,290. This equals $1,747 per revenue touch opportunity.

And with $10.00 more on each invoice, Company A gets an additional $22,900.00 net profit before taxes. 

There are no additional parts, no additional labor. It is simply setting your pricing to reflect the fact that you and your team are worth $10 more per call.

Second Example: 

Company B generates $11,000,000 in revenue and has revenue touches of 870 install touches plus 8,400 demand service call touches plus 4,000 service maintenance touches. That is a total of 13,270 revenue touches. Again, if the total $11,000,000 is divided by the 13,270 in revenue touches, this company’s per revenue touch opportunity is equal to $829.

And with $10.00 more on each invoice, Company B generates an additional $132,700.00 Net Profit.

Third Example: 

Company C does $3,800,000 in revenue and has revenue touches of 600 install touches plus 1600 demand service touches plus 1500 service maintenance touches. That is a total of 3,700 revenue touches and equals $1,027 per revenue touch opportunity.

And with $10.00 more on each invoice, Company C gets an additional $37,000.00 NPT.

Fourth Example: 

Company D does $6,000,000 in revenue and has revenue touches of 475 install touches plus 2300 demand service touches plus 3800 service maintenance touches for a total of 6,575 revenue touches. 

This equals $913 per revenue touch opportunity.

And with $10.00 more on each invoice, Company D gets an additional $65,750.00 NPT.

In Summary:

Company A….$4,000,000….$1,747 per touch point

Company B…$11,000,000….$829 per touchpoint

Company C…$3,800,000….$1027 per touchpoint

Company D…$6,000,000…$913 per touchpoint

Notice this KPI has nothing to do with the size of the revenue. Instead, this analysis is about efficiently balancing install and service labor utilization. That is the major difference between these companies. It is about effective marketing and building a strong value proposition in the market brand. It is also driven by average ticket and gross profit dollar contribution performance. It is about a very positive break-even mark. Here is a mini case study. 

Our son just had a no cooling event in Texas, where we have many 100 plus degree temperatures. He called a service provider who came out at a promised time. 

It was a condenser fan motor. Parts and labor were $629.00. Done deal, right?  

Here is the other part of the story. My son’s home is 16 years old and has the original builder selected system. He is lucky if that 16-year-old unit that is out of warranty is functioning at 9 SEER today. 

The technician never presented the option of a replacement solution and the benefits of a ten-year warranty and higher efficiency. And this is a consumer with the financial capacity to upgrade. So $629.00 could have been $8,629.00 very easily. And with financing only $120.00 per month for the customer! This is indicative of a revenue touch that was not optimized. This touch under-performed. That was not a good deal for the customer and not a good deal for the HVAC company.

Vicki and I attended one of the Super Conferences conducted by Stochastics, one of the Service Roundtable Preferred partners. Mike Layton commented that the perfect HVAC company is one that does installations only. Now, the reality is we have to stand behind what we sell and install and service. And leads do come from service for replacement equipment. But Mike makes a good point: We must balance the labor capacity utilization between installation and service. And looking at the revenue per customer touch illustrated above, too much service labor burn rate can stifle a company’s performance.

Vicki and I like to see 80% installation revenue versus 20% service revenue as a business model target, or as close as management can get to a 4:1 ratio.

Conclusion:

Too many labor hours devoted to service can stagnate a company’s growth potential. So, track and trend the revenue per customer touchpoint KPI. 

You will be glad you did.

 

Written by John LaPlant

Service Roundtable is dedicated to growing your bottom line and helping your business maximize its full potential. These groups of contractors work together to assist you with marketing, sales, business, and so much more. Twice a month, seminars around the United States and Canada are held to network and further assist your business. Visit Service Roundtable.com to see if there are Success Days in your area!

When is it Time to Hire Your Next Tech?

One of the main questions that always comes up in a growing company is:

“How do I know WHEN it’s time to hire my next technician?”

It’s an important question to know how to answer. Often the decision is made on emotion when we’re frustrated or feeling burnt out. I frequently see owners and managers decide “in the moment” without tangible guiding principles and benchmarks to assist them. Now, your “gut” may be right, but it’s important to have some measurables that you can check-in with to validate the decision.

I’m going to outline three fundamentals that drive when it’s time to hire. I’ll discuss each and provide some points, so you know with certainty that “it’s time.” Then you can make your next hire with confidence.

They are:
  • You are overwhelmed with more work than you can get to.
  • It’s time to replace an existing team member.
  • Planned growth – hire great people before you need them.

Let’s discuss each one in more detail:

You Are Overwhelmed with More Work Than You Can Get To

This is a good sign that it’s time to make your next hire. When it comes to work overload, it’s important to know:

  • If the current workload is TEMPORARY or CONSISTENT
TEMPORARY need may look like this:
  • You have a large job you don’t normally take on, causing a short-term labor crunch that will disappear when the job is complete.

If this is the case, that would not warrant a permanent long-term hire but perhaps the need for temp labor or some other short-term solution. You don’t want to make a great hire and then not have a plan when the work volume suddenly disappears after the project. This can cost you money and great people.

CONSISTENT need may look like this:
  • Your lead volume is consistently up due to a great marketing strategy or local market conditions. You and the team are stretched beyond capacity.

This is great news and is a good sign that it’s time to hire your next technician. Here are some measurable guidelines you should apply to this scenario.

  • The current team should be stretched to managing 50% of the revenue that could be handed off to the new technician.
  • Marketing should be immediately ramped up to fill the remaining 50% capacity as fast as possible.

If you are experiencing temporary or consistent demand and need help determining how to proceed with confidence, we can help.

It’s Time to Replace an Existing Team Member

There are many reasons that a team member may need to move on from your organization. Two of the most common are:

  • Underperformance to company benchmarks and/or
  • Behavioral issues that affect company culture.

Let’s discuss both of these scenarios:

If a team member is underperforming to company performance benchmarks:

  • Look for performance trends over time. Are they showing any signs of improvement or moving closer to the target?
  • Be sure the company has made the proper investments in the team member. For example:
  • Provide proper training, coaching, and support to give them every opportunity to meet expectations.

If a team member is having repeated behavioral challenges and/or is affecting team culture negatively:

  • Make sure the company has followed the disciplinary policies and procedures, and the team member has an improvement plan in place.
  • Have the current behaviors been consistent since joining the team, or is it a recent change? 
  • Perhaps it is an opportunity to check-in and see if something is causing the behavior that can be re-directed.

Finding great people is always a top priority for trades businesses. If you are unsure what to do with a current team member or need assistance working through this process, we can help if you contact us.

Hire Great People Before You Need Them

Great companies are intentional with their growth and plan for the future. The best way to know if it’s time to hire your next technician is because you are executing a well thought out plan. 

To do this in confidence, you will need to establish your annual budget and forecast for the next 12 months.

This is a critical business tool that will allow you to enter each month intentionally and:

  • See in advance when you need your next technician.
  • Establish a hiring and recruiting strategy in alignment with those goals.

Developing a 12-month budget and growth plan can be intimidating, especially if you have never done it. It is also important to understand how to utilize your annual budget and forecast weekly, monthly, and quarterly so your plan can be executed. If you need assistance with this process, then reach out. We are happy to help.

I hope these ideas will help you establish some guidelines and a framework for when to hire your next technician. If you have questions or would like to talk to a Service Excellence coach about this process, we would love to hear from you.

Kenny Smith is the newest team member of Service Excellence Training. He is a success coach of the PRESS PLAY Training System and an experienced Business Consultant.

Service Roundtable is dedicated to growing your bottom line and helping your business maximize its full potential. These groups of contractors work together to assist you with marketing, sales, business, and so much more. Twice a month, seminars around the United States and Canada are held to network and further assist your business. Visit Service Roundtable.com to see if there are Success Days in your area!