Count Your Blessings

We all have heard the expression: “You should count your blessings.” This phrase is used in several different contexts. Someone may express this sentiment when something good happens to you: “That’s great news; you should count your blessings.” When something upsetting happens to you: “I’m sorry to hear that, but it could be worse, you should count your blessings.” Or even when something bad happens to someone else: “It’s so sad what happened to them, we should count our blessings.” There are even certain times of the year when we are asked to stop and think about all the things that make us happy or bring us joy.

Every fourth Thursday in November, we celebrate Thanksgiving, which is when many of us count our blessings. Yet do we need to wait for a holiday to give thanks and count our blessings? Is this just a saying, or should we really take it literally? I would suggest that when we count our blessings, we note all the wonderful things in our lives. Write a list, a gratitude list, if you will that helps us to appreciate how good life is and read it daily. Start your day out with gratitude!

It’s better not to take our blessings for granted or wait for a holiday to celebrate them. When we take something for granted, we tend not to appreciate it. So, let’s take a step back and consider what a blessing really is.

In our secular world, a blessing is considered something that brings us happiness or helps us somehow. To religious people, a blessing is approval and help from a higher source, that being God. A blessing can also be a sign of approval when someone permits you to do something. “You have my blessing to do so…” Counting all these blessings is important. It shows that you are grateful and are expressing a feeling of appreciation or thanks. When we count our blessings, we can say it like this: “I am thankful for my family. I am thankful for my friends. I am thankful for my health.”

Other forms of “blessings” are expressed as “the little things in life” or the “small blessings,” “a mixed blessing,” or a “blessing in disguise.”

Let’s say you get angry because your car won’t start, and you start thinking of all the negative ramifications it may cause. But then you stop for a moment and think, “Well, at least I have a car. I should consider myself lucky and give thanks for small blessings.”

Another small blessing is a fun thing known as “Pay it forward.” Paying it forward is expressed when the beneficiary of a good deed is repaying the kindness to others instead of the original benefactor. Paying someone’s toll or buying a cup of coffee for the person behind you is a common example. Small acts of kindness, like paying forward, can really make someone’s day and can be added to their gratitude list for the day!

Not all blessings are that simple and easy to recognize. Some are more complex than others, like “mixed blessings.” A mixed blessing is something that is both good and bad. For example, being a rock star can be a mixed blessing. On the one hand, they are treated as a celebrity with special perks, benefits, and financial rewards. On the other hand, they may lose their privacy, be more susceptible to addictive behavior, and feel pressured to produce that next hit song to keep their status. In the case of mixed blessings, focusing on the good and avoiding the bad can be a blessing in and of itself.

Another type of blessing is what we call “A blessing in disguise.” It is a little more complicated than a mixed blessing can be. This is where the blessing is hidden or “disguised” in a bad event or situation that we may have experienced. It refers to something that at first appears to be bad or unlucky but is actually good.

For example, someone losing their job turned out to be a blessing in disguise when it forced her to start a business that became very successful and that she loves and is passionate about.

As you can see, there are many types of blessings that we can be grateful for every day. Yet sometimes, it’s hard to focus on these blessings when we are bombarded every day with predominately negative news. I’m not saying that we shouldn’t be concerned with local, national, and worldly events. We can’t just bury our heads in the sand, but it gives us all the more reason to count our blessings!

So, this does take some effort and deliberate concentration on the good in our lives and the world around us. Whether the blessings are small, mixed, or disguised – they all count! And while this may all seem elementary, I thought we could all use a reminder to count our blessings. I know I do!

 

Steve Mores is the Vice President of Training and Sales at Dynamic Air Quality Solutions.

Service Roundtable is dedicated to growing your bottom line and helping your business maximize its full potential. These groups of contractors work together to assist you with marketing, sales, business, and so much more. Twice a month, seminars around the United States and Canada are held to network and further assist your business. Visit Service Roundtable.com to see if there are Success Days in your area.

Summer’s Coming – Don’t Get Busy

Hiring and Firing Customers.

Raise your hand with me, if you will…come on, now…do you get stuck in the mindset and bad HABIT of feeling like you have to serve every customer that calls in and requests your company’s services?

We know that the value of just one customer is great, but are there customers that exist that actually decrease value? Over the past three years, the contractor/customer relationship has changed drastically. The demand for speed and convenience alone has changed the landscape, not to mention transactional differences, and with more and more technicians going out on their own these days, profit is harder to make. Profit can be made in this industry, but it can also be forfeited for the missionary mandate of serving all in need. Let me give you some of the greatest advice that my contractor dad shared with me: You do not have to help every customer that calls in; you can say no. And as a matter of fact, saying yes to every caller is a bad habit – businesses are built and torn down by something as small as a habit.

I get that our need to help and find solutions is why we do what we do, but to serve our communities at the expense of our business is not why we started our companies. When we realize that we do not have to provide service to everyone, we become empowered to begin building the type of customer base that allows us to succeed and enjoy the experience.

THE CALL

How many times have you heard on the other end of the line, “Do you treat all of your customers like that? You’re not much of a businessman, are you?” or “You won’t last long.” How about this one?  “Well, you know you are legally required to run the service calls in the order that you get them.” Yes, this happened to us in our contracting business. Some people believe that your service is simply there to serve them the exact way they want. We say, “The customer is always right,” but what we should say is, “The customer we choose to give service to because of mutual respect and clear expectations is always right.” There’s a big difference. And the big difference is that we retain and please the customers we want, and in return, they choose to keep us as their service provider.

 

THE SELECTION PROCESS

How exactly do we choose them? With spring coming to an end and summer upon us, as the phone calls begin to pour in, how do we stop from getting so busy and covered up with too many of the ‘maybe good, maybe bad’ customers? How do we change the habit?

  • First, write out your ideal customer profile and be sure to include the neighborhoods they live in. (Example: homeowner, ages 45 & up, multiple systems in their home, 90210 zip code)
    1. I’m kidding about that 90210 zip code. Our ideal customers don’t all need to live in Beverly Hills, but we need to target neighborhoods that we want to be working in – these neighborhoods may be near elementary schools, suburbs, or golf courses.
  • Second, tag all existing customers if they match that profile. Don’t forget that many of your existing customers are ones you want to keep.
  • Third, stop giving your resources and attention to customers that don’t fit the bill. Does this mean you stop giving them service altogether? Not necessarily. But what this does mean is to stop trying to milk a cow that has no milk.

After you make your profile:

  1. Scan your customer database and make some cuts.
  2. Focus on who you already have, and then plan to become more intentional with these customers.
  3. Make contact immediately.

Current customers are the easiest and most affordable way to re-energize your services. Adams Hudson, a friend and fellow consultant, says, “The reason most of them (55%) leave you is due to your perceived indifference. They think you don’t care whether they stay or not! How could you possibly allow that perception to go unchallenged?” Contact your most valuable assets! No excuses. This contact might include any of the following:

  • Multiple postcards a year
  • Thank-you cards after service calls
  • A few non-sales-y phone calls a year
  • A monthly newsletter
  • Four gifts a year (magnets, cups, pens, t-shirts, etc.)

It doesn’t take a large budget to be intentional with your priority one customers. Even the smallest gesture can make a large ripple and put you back in their top-of-mind Rolodex. Then, focus on the new. Go out and get those new priority customers. You will need to focus on filling the spaces you emptied to make room for the best. Use the same profile you used with your existing customers. Before you know it, your customer list will be full of profit-making names, and the relationship you have with those customers will be part of the reason you stay in business with each new year.

 

P.S. This is an oldie but a goodie; check out this ‘Creative Call-Taking’ video for more on how to prioritize when you get busy this summer! https://youtu.be/wf-6GBJvNRU

 

Danielle Putnam is the President of The New Flat Rate and on the Advisory Board of Women in HVACR.

Service Roundtable is dedicated to growing your bottom line and helping your business maximize its full potential. These groups of contractors work together to assist you with marketing, sales, business, and so much more. Twice a month, seminars around the United States and Canada are held to network and further assist your business. Visit Service Roundtable.com to see if there are Success Days in your area.

Three Powerful Price Conditioning Techniques

I know that you have experienced this:

You’re at the end of your presentation, you present your price, and the client is shocked. Deeply shocked!

They’re so shocked, in fact, that their reactions can be anywhere from sad, to confused, to downright furious! They can even be shell-shocked to the point that they don’t even know what to say.

When this happens, they’re not going to buy. You are going to get a load of excuses. You’ve heard these before, right?

Let me think about it.

We’ll call you back when we’re ready to make a decision.

I have to get three bids before I can do anything.

The real reason why you got slammed with objections is because your client wasn’t prepared for the price. The good news is, we can fix that!

I’m going to teach you three techniques that you can use to make sure that your client is prepared for the price.

 

Technique #1: Explain the Investment Factors

When you’re presenting a large ticket item, it’s important to start price conditioning very early in the call. This technique is used prior to your heat load calculation or your system design work.

There are several good ways to use investment factors, but to keep it simple for this example, I want to limit it to two.

It works by explaining that there are two major factors that are going to affect the price of a system:

  1. Options that can be controlled by the client, and
  2. Options that aren’t in anyone’s control.

In this technique, you’re going to pick out some items that will increase or decrease the total cost of a system. Then you’re going to tie this into their system options. You could explain how increasing efficiency increases the price. You could also explain how bigger systems are naturally going to increase the price.

Once you have given the homeowner a series of features and benefits that affect price, you’re then going to relate that to a sliding investment scale. To make this really work well, you could even use a visual representation of this sliding investment scale.

This is a great technique that is very effective at communicating the investment range and choices that a homeowner will have. If you would like to hear some examples in greater detail, make sure you listen to the audio version of today’s blog.

 

Technique #2: Use the Shock and Awe Statement

The Shock and Awe statement is a tried-and-true classic for any salesperson. It is used to coax out the budget that a homeowner has in mind when they are not willing to freely give it.

Here’s how it works:

  • You asked the client to tell you what budget they had in mind for this project.
  • They give you some type of reason why they’re not going to tell you.
  • You then ask them if they’re willing to invest a very large sum to get the project done. Be specific, say something like “$20,000.”
  • You keep your mouth closed and wait for them to talk. They will usually tell you no, they will not spend that much money.
  • You then ask them what they’re willing to invest.
  • Surprisingly, 90% of the time they’re going to tell you now

This technique works because of human nature. The homeowner will not be expecting the surprise of you being so bold to ask for a large amount. So, it loosens their lips just enough to tell you what budget they actually had in mind.

Once you know this information, then you also know how much value you need to build.

 

Technique #3: Reference Other Jobs

This is my personal favorite technique. The reason why I love it so much is because it ties in technique number one and two with real examples.

In this technique, you’re simply going to share with the homeowner some real examples of other people that have made very large investments with your company and why they did that. You’ll also share some lower to middle examples of investments made with your company.

The whole point of this technique is to say the following;

When it comes to new systems for your home, Bob and Betty, we have a very large range of options. The great news is you’re going to be able to pick one that’s going to work for you.

This technique is received very well by the homeowners, and it works fantastically! I absolutely love it.

Here’s my closing thought for today: price conditioning is a normal part of the sales process. It helps you and the client make good decisions. It’s also a skill that is quite uncomfortable for many people. My best recommendation to you is to start practicing it today and master it for your own success!

 

Todd Liles is the CEO of Service Excellence.

Service Roundtable is dedicated to growing your bottom line and helping your business maximize its full potential. These groups of contractors work together to assist you with marketing, sales, business, and so much more. Twice a month, seminars around the United States and Canada are held to network and further assist your business. Visit Service Roundtable.com to see if there are Success Days in your area.